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Wrigley’s Extra Spearmint Gum - 27g

Wrigley’s Extra Spearmint Gum - 27g

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Barcode: 93613903

Quantity: 27g

Packaging: Paper, Cardboard

Brands: Wrigley's

Categories: Snacks, Sweet snacks, Confectioneries, Chewing gum, Sugar-free chewing gum

Labels, certifications, awards: Low or no sugar, No sugar

Manufacturing or processing places: Australia

Stores: Woolworths, Coles, Officeworks, Kmart, Big-W

Countries where sold: Australia

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Health

Ingredients

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    18 ingredients


    SORBITOL, GUM BASE, HUMECTANT (422), MANNITOL, FLAVOURS, SWEETENER (951), COLOURS (133, 160a), EMULSIFIER (SOY LECITHIN), ANTIOXIDANTS (321, 320). EXCESS CONSUMPTION MAY HAVE A LAXATIVE EFFECT. CONTAINS PHENYLALANINE.
    Allergens: Soybeans

Food processing

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    Ultra processed foods


    Elements that indicate the product is in the 4 - Ultra processed food and drink products group:

    • Additive: E133 - Brilliant blue FCF
    • Additive: E160a - Carotene
    • Additive: E322 - Lecithins
    • Additive: E420 - Sorbitol
    • Additive: E421 - Mannitol
    • Additive: E422 - Glycerol
    • Additive: E951 - Aspartame
    • Ingredient: Colour
    • Ingredient: Emulsifier
    • Ingredient: Flavouring
    • Ingredient: Humectant
    • Ingredient: Sweetener

    Food products are classified into 4 groups according to their degree of processing:

    1. Unprocessed or minimally processed foods
    2. Processed culinary ingredients
    3. Processed foods
    4. Ultra processed foods

    The determination of the group is based on the category of the product and on the ingredients it contains.

    Learn more about the NOVA classification

Additives

  • E133 - Brilliant blue FCF


    Brilliant Blue FCF: Brilliant Blue FCF -Blue 1- is an organic compound classified as a triarylmethane dye and a blue azo dye, reflecting its chemical structure. Known under various commercial names, it is a colorant for foods and other substances. It is denoted by E number E133 and has a color index of 42090. It has the appearance of a blue powder. It is soluble in water, and the solution has a maximum absorption at about 628 nanometers.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E160a - Carotene


    Carotene: The term carotene -also carotin, from the Latin carota, "carrot"- is used for many related unsaturated hydrocarbon substances having the formula C40Hx, which are synthesized by plants but in general cannot be made by animals -with the exception of some aphids and spider mites which acquired the synthesizing genes from fungi-. Carotenes are photosynthetic pigments important for photosynthesis. Carotenes contain no oxygen atoms. They absorb ultraviolet, violet, and blue light and scatter orange or red light, and -in low concentrations- yellow light. Carotenes are responsible for the orange colour of the carrot, for which this class of chemicals is named, and for the colours of many other fruits, vegetables and fungi -for example, sweet potatoes, chanterelle and orange cantaloupe melon-. Carotenes are also responsible for the orange -but not all of the yellow- colours in dry foliage. They also -in lower concentrations- impart the yellow coloration to milk-fat and butter. Omnivorous animal species which are relatively poor converters of coloured dietary carotenoids to colourless retinoids have yellowed-coloured body fat, as a result of the carotenoid retention from the vegetable portion of their diet. The typical yellow-coloured fat of humans and chickens is a result of fat storage of carotenes from their diets. Carotenes contribute to photosynthesis by transmitting the light energy they absorb to chlorophyll. They also protect plant tissues by helping to absorb the energy from singlet oxygen, an excited form of the oxygen molecule O2 which is formed during photosynthesis. β-Carotene is composed of two retinyl groups, and is broken down in the mucosa of the human small intestine by β-carotene 15‚15'-monooxygenase to retinal, a form of vitamin A. β-Carotene can be stored in the liver and body fat and converted to retinal as needed, thus making it a form of vitamin A for humans and some other mammals. The carotenes α-carotene and γ-carotene, due to their single retinyl group -β-ionone ring-, also have some vitamin A activity -though less than β-carotene-, as does the xanthophyll carotenoid β-cryptoxanthin. All other carotenoids, including lycopene, have no beta-ring and thus no vitamin A activity -although they may have antioxidant activity and thus biological activity in other ways-. Animal species differ greatly in their ability to convert retinyl -beta-ionone- containing carotenoids to retinals. Carnivores in general are poor converters of dietary ionone-containing carotenoids. Pure carnivores such as ferrets lack β-carotene 15‚15'-monooxygenase and cannot convert any carotenoids to retinals at all -resulting in carotenes not being a form of vitamin A for this species-; while cats can convert a trace of β-carotene to retinol, although the amount is totally insufficient for meeting their daily retinol needs.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E320 - Butylated hydroxyanisole (bha)


    Butylated hydroxyanisole: Butylated hydroxyanisole -BHA- is an antioxidant consisting of a mixture of two isomeric organic compounds, 2-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole and 3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole. It is prepared from 4-methoxyphenol and isobutylene. It is a waxy solid used as a food additive with the E number E320. The primary use for BHA is as an antioxidant and preservative in food, food packaging, animal feed, cosmetics, rubber, and petroleum products. BHA also is commonly used in medicines, such as isotretinoin, lovastatin, and simvastatin, among others.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E321 - Butylated hydroxytoluene


    Butylated hydroxytoluene: Butylated hydroxytoluene -BHT-, also known as dibutylhydroxytoluene, is a lipophilic organic compound, chemically a derivative of phenol, that is useful for its antioxidant properties. European and U.S. regulations allow small amounts to be used as a food additive. In addition to this use, BHT is widely used to prevent oxidation in fluids -e.g. fuel, oil- and other materials where free radicals must be controlled.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322 - Lecithins


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322i - Lecithin


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E420 - Sorbitol


    Sorbitol: Sorbitol --, less commonly known as glucitol --, is a sugar alcohol with a sweet taste which the human body metabolizes slowly. It can be obtained by reduction of glucose, which changes the aldehyde group to a hydroxyl group. Most sorbitol is made from corn syrup, but it is also found in nature, for example in apples, pears, peaches, and prunes. It is converted to fructose by sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase. Sorbitol is an isomer of mannitol, another sugar alcohol; the two differ only in the orientation of the hydroxyl group on carbon 2. While similar, the two sugar alcohols have very different sources in nature, melting points, and uses.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E421 - Mannitol


    Mannitol: Mannitol is a type of sugar alcohol which is also used as a medication. As a sugar, it is often used as a sweetener in diabetic food, as it is poorly absorbed from the intestines. As a medication, it is used to decrease pressure in the eyes, as in glaucoma, and to lower increased intracranial pressure. Medically, it is given by injection. Effects typically begin within 15 minutes and last up to 8 hours.Common side effects from medical use include electrolyte problems and dehydration. Other serious side effects may include worsening heart failure and kidney problems. It is unclear if use is safe in pregnancy. Mannitol is in the osmotic diuretic family of medications and works by pulling fluid from the brain and eyes.The discovery of mannitol is attributed to Joseph Louis Proust in 1806. It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system. The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$1.12 to 5.80 a dose. In the United States, a course of treatment costs $25 to 50. It was originally made from the flowering ash and called manna due to its supposed resemblance to the Biblical food. Mannitol is on the World Anti-Doping Agency's banned drug list due to concerns that it may mask other drugs.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E422 - Glycerol


    Glycerol: Glycerol -; also called glycerine or glycerin; see spelling differences- is a simple polyol compound. It is a colorless, odorless, viscous liquid that is sweet-tasting and non-toxic. The glycerol backbone is found in all lipids known as triglycerides. It is widely used in the food industry as a sweetener and humectant and in pharmaceutical formulations. Glycerol has three hydroxyl groups that are responsible for its solubility in water and its hygroscopic nature.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E951 - Aspartame


    Aspartame: Aspartame -APM- is an artificial non-saccharide sweetener used as a sugar substitute in some foods and beverages. In the European Union, it is codified as E951. Aspartame is a methyl ester of the aspartic acid/phenylalanine dipeptide. A panel of experts set up by the European Food Safety Authority concluded in 2013 that aspartame is safe for human consumption at current levels of exposure. As of 2018, evidence does not support a long-term benefit for weight loss or in diabetes. Because its breakdown products include phenylalanine, people with the genetic condition phenylketonuria -PKU- must be aware of this as an additional source.It was first sold under the brand name NutraSweet. It was first made in 1965, and the patent expired in 1992. It was initially approved for use in food products by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration -FDA- in 1981. The safety of aspartame has been the subject of several political and medical controversies, United States congressional hearings, and Internet hoaxes.
    Source: Wikipedia

Ingredients analysis

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    Palm oil content unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: 422, 951, 133, 160a, 321, 320, Excess-consumption-may-have-a-laxative-effect, Contains-phenylalanine

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

  • icon

    Vegan status unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Gum base, 422, 951, 133, 160a, 321, 320, Excess-consumption-may-have-a-laxative-effect, Contains-phenylalanine

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

  • icon

    Vegetarian status unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Gum base, 422, 951, 133, 160a, 321, 320, Excess-consumption-may-have-a-laxative-effect, Contains-phenylalanine

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

The analysis is based solely on the ingredients listed and does not take into account processing methods.
  • icon

    Details of the analysis of the ingredients

    We need your help!

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

    SORBITOL, GUM BASE, HUMECTANT (422), MANNITOL, FLAVOURS, SWEETENER (951), COLOURS (133, 160a), EMULSIFIER (SOY LECITHIN), ANTIOXIDANTS (321, 320), EXCESS CONSUMPTION MAY HAVE A LAXATIVE EFFECT, CONTAINS PHENYLALANINE
    1. SORBITOL -> en:e420 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 9.09090909090909 - percent_max: 100
    2. GUM BASE -> en:gum-base - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 50
    3. HUMECTANT -> en:humectant - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 33.3333333333333
      1. 422 -> en:422 - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 33.3333333333333
    4. MANNITOL -> en:e421 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 25
    5. FLAVOURS -> en:flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 20
    6. SWEETENER -> en:sweetener - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 16.6666666666667
      1. 951 -> en:951 - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 16.6666666666667
    7. COLOURS -> en:colour - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 14.2857142857143
      1. 133 -> en:133 - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 14.2857142857143
      2. 160a -> en:160a - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 7.14285714285714
    8. EMULSIFIER -> en:emulsifier - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 12.5
      1. SOY LECITHIN -> en:soya-lecithin - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 12.5
    9. ANTIOXIDANTS -> en:antioxidant - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 11.1111111111111
      1. 321 -> en:321 - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 11.1111111111111
      2. 320 -> en:320 - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 5.55555555555556
    10. EXCESS CONSUMPTION MAY HAVE A LAXATIVE EFFECT -> en:excess-consumption-may-have-a-laxative-effect - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 10
    11. CONTAINS PHENYLALANINE -> en:contains-phenylalanine - percent_min: 0 - percent_max: 9.09090909090909

Nutrition

  • icon

    Sugars in low quantity (0%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of sugar can cause weight gain and tooth decay. It also augments the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of sugar and sugary drinks
    • Sugary drinks (such as sodas, fruit beverages, and fruit juices and nectars) should be limited as much as possible (no more than 1 glass a day).
    • Choose products with lower sugar content and reduce the consumption of products with added sugars.
  • icon

    Salt in low quantity (0%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of salt (or sodium) can cause raised blood pressure, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.
    • Many people who have high blood pressure do not know it, as there are often no symptoms.
    • Most people consume too much salt (on average 9 to 12 grams per day), around twice the recommended maximum level of intake.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of salt and salted food
    • Reduce the quantity of salt used when cooking, and don't salt again at the table.
    • Limit the consumption of salty snacks and choose products with lower salt content.

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    Nutrition facts


    Nutrition facts As sold
    for 100 g / 100 ml
    Compared to: Chewing gum
    Energy 947 kj
    (226 kcal)
    Fat 0 g
    Saturated fat 0 g
    Carbohydrates 0 g
    Sugars 0 g
    Fiber 0 g
    Proteins 0 g
    Salt 0 g
    Fruits‚ vegetables‚ nuts and rapeseed‚ walnut and olive oils (estimate from ingredients list analysis) 0 %

Environment

Packaging

Transportation

Data sources

Product added on by kiliweb
Last edit of product page on by archanox.
Product page also edited by clockwerx, danzo7, ecoscore-impact-estimator, openfoodfacts-contributors, packbot, yuka.UUo4alAvNDdxYWM3dGZNZDVCRHYyUDR1N1krWVlVaTZBTmd4SUE9PQ, yuka.sY2b0xO6T85zoF3NwEKvllNOVf_9hmj-MRLQhXCPyozePJvib_dw87noLKg, yuka.sY2b0xO6T85zoF3NwEKvlm4eA-SE8wmUbgPUi1WJx962FcTVP8F-zbjmHqs, yuka.sY2b0xO6T85zoF3NwEKvlmpJbfXUpBjlMCbTglKG24-McoPJTuAi-avbDqs.

If the data is incomplete or incorrect, you can complete or correct it by editing this page.