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Jelly Tip Block - Whittaker's - 250g

Jelly Tip Block - Whittaker's - 250g

Barcode: 9420063600428 (EAN / EAN-13)

Quantity: 250g

Packaging: Paper

Brands: Whittaker's

Categories: Snacks, Sweet snacks, Cocoa and its products, Confectioneries, Bars, Chocolate candies, Bars covered with chocolate

Origin of ingredients: New Zealand

Countries where sold: Australia

Matching with your preferences

Health

Ingredients

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    26 ingredients


    WHITE CHOCOLATE 44% [SUGAR; MILK POWDER 30%* COCOA BUTTER 28%* EMULSIFIER (SOY LECITHIN); VANILLA FLAVOUR). JELLY TIP FILLING 30% [GLUCOSE; SUGAR WATER, INVERT SYRUP; ACIDITY REGULATORS (CITRIC ACID & SODIUM CITRATE); NATURAL RASPBERRY FLAVOUR; GELLING AGENT (PECTIN); THICKENER (LOCUST BEAN GUM) NATURAL COLOUR (163). MILK CHOCOLATE 26% [SUGAR; COCOA SOLIDS 33%* (COCOA MASS & COCOA BUTTER) MILK POWDER 30%* EMULSIFIER (SOY LECITHIN); VANILLA FLAVOUR *MINIMUM PERCENTAGE. MAY CONTAIN TRACES OF PEANUTS, TREE NUTS AND GLUTEN
    Allergens: Milk, Soybeans
    Traces: Gluten, Nuts, Peanuts

Food processing

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    Ultra processed foods


    Elements that indicate the product is in the 4 - Ultra processed food and drink products group:

    • Additive: E163 - Anthocyanins
    • Additive: E322 - Lecithins
    • Additive: E440 - Pectins
    • Ingredient: Colour
    • Ingredient: Flavouring
    • Ingredient: Gelling agent
    • Ingredient: Glucose
    • Ingredient: Invert sugar
    • Ingredient: Thickener

    Food products are classified into 4 groups according to their degree of processing:

    1. Unprocessed or minimally processed foods
    2. Processed culinary ingredients
    3. Processed foods
    4. Ultra processed foods

    The determination of the group is based on the category of the product and on the ingredients it contains.

    Learn more about the NOVA classification

Additives

  • E163 - Anthocyanins


    Anthocyanin: Anthocyanins -also anthocyans; from Greek: ἄνθος -anthos- "flower" and κυάνεος/κυανοῦς kyaneos/kyanous "dark blue"- are water-soluble vacuolar pigments that, depending on their pH, may appear red, purple, or blue. Food plants rich in anthocyanins include the blueberry, raspberry, black rice, and black soybean, among many others that are red, blue, purple, or black. Some of the colors of autumn leaves are derived from anthocyanins.Anthocyanins belong to a parent class of molecules called flavonoids synthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway. They occur in all tissues of higher plants, including leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Anthocyanins are derived from anthocyanidins by adding sugars. They are odorless and moderately astringent. Although approved to color foods and beverages in the European Union, anthocyanins are not approved for use as a food additive because they have not been verified as safe when used as food or supplement ingredients. There is no conclusive evidence anthocyanins have any effect on human biology or diseases.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322 - Lecithins


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E322i - Lecithin


    Lecithin: Lecithin -UK: , US: , from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk"- is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances -and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic-, and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders -emulsifying-, homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid.Lecithin was first isolated in 1845 by the French chemist and pharmacist Theodore Gobley. In 1850, he named the phosphatidylcholine lécithine. Gobley originally isolated lecithin from egg yolk—λέκιθος lekithos is "egg yolk" in Ancient Greek—and established the complete chemical formula of phosphatidylcholine in 1874; in between, he had demonstrated the presence of lecithin in a variety of biological matters, including venous blood, in human lungs, bile, human brain tissue, fish eggs, fish roe, and chicken and sheep brain. Lecithin can easily be extracted chemically using solvents such as hexane, ethanol, acetone, petroleum ether, benzene, etc., or extraction can be done mechanically. It is usually available from sources such as soybeans, eggs, milk, marine sources, rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower. It has low solubility in water, but is an excellent emulsifier. In aqueous solution, its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that usually is classified as amphipathic. Lecithin is sold as a food additive and dietary supplement. In cooking, it is sometimes used as an emulsifier and to prevent sticking, for example in nonstick cooking spray.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E330 - Citric acid


    Citric acid: Citric acid is a weak organic acid that has the chemical formula C6H8O7. It occurs naturally in citrus fruits. In biochemistry, it is an intermediate in the citric acid cycle, which occurs in the metabolism of all aerobic organisms. More than a million tons of citric acid are manufactured every year. It is used widely as an acidifier, as a flavoring and chelating agent.A citrate is a derivative of citric acid; that is, the salts, esters, and the polyatomic anion found in solution. An example of the former, a salt is trisodium citrate; an ester is triethyl citrate. When part of a salt, the formula of the citrate ion is written as C6H5O3−7 or C3H5O-COO-3−3.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E331 - Sodium citrates


    Sodium citrate: Sodium citrate may refer to any of the sodium salts of citrate -though most commonly the third-: Monosodium citrate Disodium citrate Trisodium citrateThe three forms of the salt are collectively known by the E number E331. Sodium citrates are used as acidity regulators in food and drinks, and also as emulsifiers for oils. They enable cheeses to melt without becoming greasy.
    Source: Wikipedia
  • E440 - Pectins


    Pectin: Pectin -from Ancient Greek: πηκτικός pēktikós, "congealed, curdled"- is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants. It was first isolated and described in 1825 by Henri Braconnot. It is produced commercially as a white to light brown powder, mainly extracted from citrus fruits, and is used in food as a gelling agent, particularly in jams and jellies. It is also used in dessert fillings, medicines, sweets, as a stabilizer in fruit juices and milk drinks, and as a source of dietary fiber.
    Source: Wikipedia

Ingredients analysis

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    Palm oil content unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Milk-powder-30-cocoa-butter-28-emulsifier, Jelly-tip-filling, Sugar-water, 163, Milk-powder-30-emulsifier, Vanilla-flavour-minimum-percentage

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

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    Non-vegan


    Non-vegan ingredients: Milk chocolate

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

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    Vegetarian status unknown


    Unrecognized ingredients: Milk-powder-30-cocoa-butter-28-emulsifier, Jelly-tip-filling, Sugar-water, Sodium citrate, 163, Milk-powder-30-emulsifier, Vanilla-flavour-minimum-percentage

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

The analysis is based solely on the ingredients listed and does not take into account processing methods.
  • icon

    Details of the analysis of the ingredients

    We need your help!

    Some ingredients could not be recognized.

    We need your help!

    You can help us recognize more ingredients and better analyze the list of ingredients for this product and others:

    • Edit this product page to correct spelling mistakes in the ingredients list, and/or to remove ingredients in other languages and sentences that are not related to the ingredients.
    • Add new entries, synonyms or translations to our multilingual lists of ingredients, ingredient processing methods, and labels.

    If you would like to help, join the #ingredients channel on our Slack discussion space and/or learn about ingredients analysis on our wiki. Thank you!

    WHITE CHOCOLATE 44%, SUGAR, MILK POWDER 30%* COCOA BUTTER 28%* EMULSIFIER (SOY LECITHIN), VANILLA FLAVOUR, JELLY TIP FILLING 30%, GLUCOSE, SUGAR WATER, INVERT SYRUP, ACIDITY REGULATORS (CITRIC ACID, SODIUM CITRATE), NATURAL RASPBERRY FLAVOUR, GELLING AGENT (PECTIN), THICKENER (LOCUST BEAN GUM), NATURAL COLOUR (163), MILK CHOCOLATE 26%, SUGAR, COCOA SOLIDS 33% (COCOA MASS and COCOA BUTTER), MILK POWDER 30%* EMULSIFIER (SOY LECITHIN), VANILLA FLAVOUR *MINIMUM PERCENTAGE
    1. WHITE CHOCOLATE -> en:white-chocolate - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: yes - percent: 44
    2. SUGAR -> en:sugar - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    3. MILK POWDER 30%* COCOA BUTTER 28%* EMULSIFIER -> en:milk-powder-30-cocoa-butter-28-emulsifier
      1. SOY LECITHIN -> en:soya-lecithin - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    4. VANILLA FLAVOUR -> en:vanilla-flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe
    5. JELLY TIP FILLING -> en:jelly-tip-filling - percent: 30
    6. GLUCOSE -> en:glucose - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    7. SUGAR WATER -> en:sugar-water
    8. INVERT SYRUP -> en:invert-sugar-syrup - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    9. ACIDITY REGULATORS -> en:acidity-regulator
      1. CITRIC ACID -> en:e330 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
      2. SODIUM CITRATE -> en:sodium-citrate
    10. NATURAL RASPBERRY FLAVOUR -> en:natural-raspberry-flavouring - vegan: maybe - vegetarian: maybe
    11. GELLING AGENT -> en:gelling-agent
      1. PECTIN -> en:e440a - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    12. THICKENER -> en:thickener
      1. LOCUST BEAN GUM -> en:e410 - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    13. NATURAL COLOUR -> en:natural-colours
      1. 163 -> en:163
    14. MILK CHOCOLATE -> en:milk-chocolate - vegan: no - vegetarian: yes - percent: 26
    15. SUGAR -> en:sugar - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    16. COCOA SOLIDS -> en:cocoa-solids - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes - percent: 33
      1. COCOA MASS and COCOA BUTTER -> en:cocoa-mass-and-cocoa-butter - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    17. MILK POWDER 30%* EMULSIFIER -> en:milk-powder-30-emulsifier
      1. SOY LECITHIN -> en:soya-lecithin - vegan: yes - vegetarian: yes
    18. VANILLA FLAVOUR *MINIMUM PERCENTAGE -> en:vanilla-flavour-minimum-percentage

Nutrition

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    Sugars in high quantity (51.5%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of sugar can cause weight gain and tooth decay. It also augments the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of sugar and sugary drinks
    • Sugary drinks (such as sodas, fruit beverages, and fruit juices and nectars) should be limited as much as possible (no more than 1 glass a day).
    • Choose products with lower sugar content and reduce the consumption of products with added sugars.
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    Salt in low quantity (0.22%)


    What you need to know
    • A high consumption of salt (or sodium) can cause raised blood pressure, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.
    • Many people who have high blood pressure do not know it, as there are often no symptoms.
    • Most people consume too much salt (on average 9 to 12 grams per day), around twice the recommended maximum level of intake.

    Recommendation: Limit the consumption of salt and salted food
    • Reduce the quantity of salt used when cooking, and don't salt again at the table.
    • Limit the consumption of salty snacks and choose products with lower salt content.

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    Nutrition facts


    Nutrition facts As sold
    for 100 g / 100 ml
    As sold
    per serving (25g)
    Compared to: Bars covered with chocolate
    Fat 23.2 g 5.8 g -6%
    Saturated fat ? ?
    Carbohydrates 59.3 g 14.8 g +5%
    Sugars 51.5 g 12.9 g +8%
    Fiber ? ?
    Proteins 6 g 1.5 g +7%
    Salt 0.22 g 0.055 g -8%
    Fruits‚ vegetables‚ nuts and rapeseed‚ walnut and olive oils (estimate from ingredients list analysis) 0 % 0 %
Serving size: 25g

Environment

Transportation

Data sources

Product added on by trolley
Last edit of product page on by packbot.
Product page also edited by openfoodfacts-contributors.

If the data is incomplete or incorrect, you can complete or correct it by editing this page.